Excuses

When Your Excuses are Just Excuses

It took me a long time to figure out that I control my life.

I used to believe I didn’t have a choice.

Each day was a repeat of the one before and the next would be the same as today. Nothing ever changed.

I made excuses.

I never had enough time or money. I didn’t have enough time because I was always working so I could have enough money. But no matter how much I worked, I never seemed to have enough money.

I was like a prisoner in my own life.

I didn’t have dreams.

All I could focus on was the day ahead. The bills due at the end of the week.

I wasn’t happy.

But I also wasn’t miserable enough to have a reason to change. The Comfort Zone. That place where you could be doing something better with your life but you’re afraid of the risk.

What if you fail?

At least you have a job. Even if you aren’t happy, it pays the bills. Maybe your marriage has dulled over the years, but it could be worse. You aren’t fighting all the time. And sure, you’ve put on a few pounds over the years, but at least you can still see the tip when you take a piss…

You get through the day by minimizing the problems and making excuses for the way things are. This is your security blanket to protect you from the realities of your life. The reality that you know you deserve better … that you’re capable of more.

You sacrifice your dreams in exchange for comfort and the illusion of security. You’re complacent and complicit. And until acted upon by an outside force, you’ll remain this way until you die.

Motivation rarely comes from within. You’re too busy trying to justify the way things are instead of doing anything to fix them. You spin things in your mind and find reasons why the problems aren’t your fault. You don’t want to take responsibility. So you blame someone else.

And so your dreams are never realized. Your goals never met.

And the cycle repeats itself.

“It isn’t my fault.”

Have your excuses become just that?

Excuses.

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Money Solves Money Problems

…and that’s all it solves.

If you’re broke, money helps.

It’ll buy you food, put a roof over your head and clothes on your back. Shoes on your feet. Gas in your car.

Money isn’t a magic potion that makes life perfect. It won’t make you happy. It won’t buy you friends … not the type of friends you want. Money won’t keep you from dying.

A lot of people think money is the answer to all of their problems. As if having money would change who they are. If they had money, then they’d do all the things they’re only  able to dream of doing.

Money isn’t the answer. And money doesn’t change who you are, it only exposes and amplifies who you are. Good or bad. If you had money, you might do some of the things you dream of doing…

Maybe.

Maybe you’d take that trip to Ireland you’ve been talking about your entire life. Or maybe you wouldn’t. Actions express priorities. If something is important to you, you’ll make it happen. If it’s not important, you’ll make an excuse.

And what better excuse than money?

It’s easy to tell yourself that [insert your dream here] is too expensive. You look at your bank account and you’re not even sure how you’re going to make it until next payday without starving.

If only you had more money … then you’d be able.

How long have you been telling yourself the same story?

What if you’d saved just $50 a month for all those years? How much could you have saved? If instead of buying that outfit that’s hanging in your closet with the tags still attached, you’d put that money towards your dream?

The truth is, your dreams don’t really matter to you. The shit you spend your money on … those things are what your care about the most. What you say you care about isn’t important.

But how you spend your money…

That’s the action that expresses your priorities.

Getting Lucky

What’s Luck Got to do with It?

What sets people apart?

Why are some people successful while others aren’t?

Being born of a specific gender with a certain color of skin in the right place at the right time doesn’t qualify (or disqualify) anyone for anything. Being intelligent doesn’t matter if you don’t apply yourself. Yet we look to these things as being advantageous even though they promise nothing.

We each have our own unique set of strengths and weaknesses … our flaws and imperfections. We all struggle to make our way in the world and some of us will endure hardships most people could never imagine.

Different people fight different battles.

It’s easy to blame bad luck for the bad things in your life. Or to believe other people only realized success thanks to good luck.

” The only good luck many great men ever had was being born with the ability and determination to overcome bad luck.” ~ Channing Pollock

Certain circumstances are more difficult to overcome than others but these things don’t preclude you from having the life you want … just as having all the “advantages” can’t ensure your success. You might have to work twice as hard just to accomplish exactly the same thing as someone else.

It isn’t fair … but that’s just the way it is sometimes.

Having the life you want isn’t about luck.

A stroke of good luck won’t make you successful without prior preparation, nor can a stroke of bad luck wipe away everything you’ve created for yourself if you’ve worked hard and prepared for the worst. You must create a margin of error in your life.

“Luck” favors the persistent.

The longer you persist, the greater your chances of success. Recognize opportunity when it comes along … it’s often disguised as hard work. If seizing that opportunity will disrupt your life, that’s a good indication you’re on the right path.

Isn’t it “life as you know it” that you’re trying to change?

It isn’t luck … it’s your choices and your actions that determine your outcome. It takes dedication, devotion, commitment and sacrifice. You change your life by stepping out of your comfort zone and doing things differently. If you want to live the life of your dreams, you have to work for it.

Success doesn’t just happen. You have to make it happen.

Behind the Article: Steven’s thoughts on “What’s Luck Got to do with It?